Interactions between insect herbivores feeding on cruciferous plants and host plant glucosinolates  
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ACTA ENTOMOLOGICA SINICA  2017, Vol. 60 Issue (9): 1093-1104    DOI: 10.16380/j.kcxb.2017.09.013
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Interactions between insect herbivores feeding on cruciferous plants and host plant glucosinolates  
MA Xiao-Li1,2,3,4, HE Wei-Yi1,2,3,4, YOU Min-Sheng1,2,3,4,*
(1. State Key Laboratory of Ecological Pest Control for Fujian and Taiwan Crops, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou 350002, China; 2. Institute of Applied Ecology, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou 350002, China; 3. Fujian-Taiwan Joint Centre for Ecological Control of Crop Pests, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou 350002, China; 4. Key Laboratory of Integrated Pest Management for Fujian-Taiwan Crops, Ministry of Agriculture, Fuzhou 350002, China)
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Abstract Cruciferous plants (Cruciferae) possess a strong glucosinolate-myrosinase defense system, known as the “mustard oil bomb”, which has been well characterized as a plant chemical defense mechanism. Glucosinolates and myrosinases are separately stored in different compartments in host plant cells. However, insect herbivore feeding, pathogen attacks and mechanical injuries may trigger interactions between these compounds, whereby myrosinase hydrolyzes glucosinolates to generate toxic products, such as isothiocyanate, nitriles and other organic thiocyanates. Insect herbivores, in turn, have evolved ingenious detoxification strategies to overcome plant chemical defenses. Corresponding to different glucosinolate profiles, these strategies are also diverse, not only between the groups of generalist and specialist herbivores, but also within each of the groups. Based on the previous studies, the major types of glucosinolates, the glucosinolate-myrosinase defense system, and the insect herbivory-induced defense responses of cruciferous plants were reviewed in this article. And how cruciferous insect herbivores detoxify, sequestrate, transport and utilize glucosinolates of their host plants were elaborated with a view to provide insights into the evolutionary adaptation of cruciferous plants and insect herbivores.  
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MA Xiao-Li
HE Wei-Yi
YOU Min-Sheng
Key wordsGlucosinolate-myrosinase   co-evolution   counteradaptation   generalist herbivores   specialist herbivores     
Cite this article:   
MA Xiao-Li,HE Wei-Yi,YOU Min-Sheng. Interactions between insect herbivores feeding on cruciferous plants and host plant glucosinolates  [J]. ACTA ENTOMOLOGICA SINICA, 2017, 60(9): 1093-1104.
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http://www.insect.org.cn/EN/10.16380/j.kcxb.2017.09.013      or     http://www.insect.org.cn/EN/Y2017/V60/I9/1093
 
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